Synthetic Genomics to Present at Two Upcoming Investor Conferences

LA JOLLA, Calif. – November 22, 2016 – Synthetic Genomics, Inc., announced today that Oliver Fetzer, Ph.D., chief executive officer, will present at two upcoming conferences.

About Synthetic Genomics
Synthetic Genomics, Inc., located in La Jolla, CA, is a leader in the fields of synthetic biology and synthetic genomics, advancing genomics to better life. Synthetic Genomics applies its intellectual property in this rapidly evolving field to design and build biological systems solving global sustainability challenges. Synthetic Genomics serves three end markets: research, bioproduction, and applied products. The company’s research offerings, commercialized through its subsidiary SGI-DNA, are revolutionizing science and medicine with next-generation genomic solutions, including the world’s first DNA printer. Synthetic Genomics applies its integrated synthetic biology capabilities to reinvent bio-based production by improving existing production systems and developing novel, optimized production hosts. Synthetic Genomics develops its applied products, typically in partnership with leading global organizations, across a variety of industries including sustainable bio-fuels, sustainable crops, nutritional supplements, vaccines, and transplantable organs.

Corporate Communications Contact
Jason Spark
Canale Communications for Synthetic Genomics, Inc.
jason@canalecomm.com
619-849-6005

Synthetic Genomics Appoints Tina Nova, Ph.D., and William McKee to Board of Directors

LA JOLLA, Calif. – November 9, 2016 – Synthetic Genomics, Inc., announced today that it has appointed industry veterans Tina Nova, Ph.D., and William McKee to its board of directors.

“Tina and Bill have decades of experience growing dynamic commercial organizations in new markets within the pharmaceutical and healthcare diagnostics industries,” said Oliver Fetzer, Ph.D., chief executive officer of Synthetic Genomics. “As we continue to advance our cell engineering capabilities and expand the applications of our technology to create new sustainable solutions in human health and other industries, Tina and Bill’s experience will be instrumental in shaping our strategy and path forward.”

Dr. Nova has served as president and chief executive officer of Molecular Stethoscope, a diagnostics company, since 2015, and previously was senior vice president and general manager of Illumina’s oncology business unit. Dr. Nova was a co-founder of Genoptix, a medical laboratory diagnostics company, and served as its president through 2014. She also served as the company’s chief executive officer and as a member of its board of directors from 2000 until Novartis AG acquired Genoptix in 2011. Dr. Nova was a co-founder of Nanogen, a provider of molecular diagnostic tests, and served as its chief operating officer and president from 1994 to 2000. She previously served as chief operating officer of Selective Genetics, a biotechnology company, and held various positions with Ligand Pharmaceuticals and Hybritech. Dr. Nova serves as the chair of the board of directors for Arena Pharmaceuticals and as a member of the board of directors of Veracyte, a diagnostics company. Dr. Nova received a bachelor’s degree in biological sciences from the University of California, Irvine, and a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of California, Riverside.

Mr. McKee most recently served as chief operating officer and chief financial officer at EKR Therapeutics, a private specialty pharmaceutical company, through its acquisition by Cornerstone Therapeutics. Prior to that, he served as the executive vice president and chief financial officer of Barr Pharmaceuticals, LLC, a subsidiary of Teva Pharmaceutical. Mr. McKee served in positions of increasing responsibility at Barr Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and was executive vice president and chief financial officer prior to its acquisition by Teva. Before this, Mr. McKee served as director of international operations and vice president, finance at Absolute Entertainment, a private developer and marketer of entertainment software. Mr. McKee previously worked at Gramkow & Carnevale, CPA’s, an accounting firm, and also worked at Deloitte & Touche. Mr. McKee currently serves on the board of directors of Agile Therapeutics, a public specialty biopharmaceutical company, and Cerulean Pharma. Mr. McKee received a bachelor’s degree in business from the University of Notre Dame.

About Synthetic Genomics

Synthetic Genomics Inc., located in La Jolla, CA, is a leader in the fields of synthetic biology and synthetic genomics, advancing genomics to better life. Synthetic Genomics applies its intellectual property in this rapidly evolving field to design and build biological systems solving global sustainability challenges. Synthetic Genomics serves three end markets: research, bioproduction, and applied products. The company’s research offerings, commercialized through its subsidiary SGI-DNA, are revolutionizing science and medicine with next-generation genomic solutions, including the world’s first DNA printer. Synthetic Genomics applies its integrated synthetic biology capabilities to reinvent bio-based production by improving existing production systems and developing novel, optimized production hosts. Synthetic Genomics develops its applied products, typically in partnership with leading global organizations, across a variety of industries including sustainable bio-fuels, sustainable crops, nutritional supplements, vaccines, and transplantable organs.

Corporate Communications Contact

Jason Spark
Canale Communications for Synthetic Genomics, Inc.
jason@canalecomm.com
619-849-6005

Synthetic Genomics team engineers Vmax™, an advantaged next-generation host organism for a wide range of biotechnology applications

Optimized system has potential to replace the workhorse E. coli by increasing speed and efficiency of protein production and cloning

LA JOLLA, CA – August 29, 2016 – Researchers from Synthetic Genomics, Inc. (SGI) announced today the development and extensive engineering of Vibrio natriegens into a next-generation biotechnology host organism Vmax™. Looking to accelerate the pace of discovery and the path to sustainable solutions, the team set out to develop a novel bacterial host that will drastically reduce the amount of time scientists spend on each experiment and workflow and to enhance productivity of the resulting new host.

After screening for the fastest-growing strain and optimizing methods for introducing DNA into those cells at high efficiencies, the team developed genome engineering tools to improve the performance of Vmax™ for common biotech applications, namely, recombinant protein expression and molecular cloning. These breakthroughs build on expertise gleaned during the creation of the first synthetic cell and first minimal cell and again position SGI at the forefront of synthetic biology.

The paper describing this work is the first peer-reviewed publication of its kind and was published online today in Nature Methods by Matthew T. Weinstock, Eric D. Hesek, Christopher M. Wilson, and Daniel G. Gibson.

http://www.nature.com/nmeth/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nmeth.3970.html

“This work provides a game-changing alternative to E. coli, the organism that has been a laboratory staple for decades, and again highlights the rapid and innovative synthetic biology expertise we’ve developed at SGI. We are in the process of designing and synthesizing new Vmax™ cells that operate at even higher efficiencies and productivity as we move toward a next-generation host for protein production”, said Daniel Gibson, Vice President, DNA Technologies, SGI.

Commenting on the origin of the research, Todd Peterson, Chief Technology Officer at SGI stated, “Despite the known drawbacks and shortcomings, scientists have been necessitated to use E. coli as a laboratory host primarily because there have been no suitable alternatives. We deployed our synthetic biology expertise to develop a new host strain that will drastically improve upon the traditional methods and tools.”

Typical cloning projects using E. coli competent cells span several days starting from the time a cloning process is initiated to the time plasmid DNA is prepared. Cloning strategies employing Vmax™ developed by the SGI team shorten that time to as little as one day.

The advancements described by the team set the stage for commercialization of these next-generation cells for cloning and protein expression by SGI in the coming months. Vmax™ is compatible with most kits, reagents, growth medium, vectors, and procedures already entrenched in laboratories. Making these cells commercially available will accelerate the pace of global biotechnological research, making a far-reaching and lasting impact toward genetic exploration and discovery worldwide.

About Synthetic Genomics Inc.

Synthetic Genomics Inc. (SGI), located in La Jolla, CA, is a leader in the fields of synthetic biology and synthetic genomics, advancing genomics to better life. SGI applies its intellectual property in this rapidly evolving field to design and build biological systems solving global sustainability challenges. SGI serves three end markets: research, bioproduction, and applied products. The company’s research offerings, commercialized through its subsidiary SGI-DNA, are revolutionizing science and medicine with next-generation genomic solutions, including the world’s first DNA printer. SGI applies its integrated synthetic biology capabilities to reinvent bio-based production by improving existing production systems and developing novel, optimized production hosts. SGI develops its applied products, typically in partnership with leading global organizations, across a variety of industries including sustainable bio-fuels, sustainable crops, nutritional supplements, vaccines, and transplantable organs.

About SGI-DNA

SGI-DNA, a wholly owned subsidiary of Synthetic Genomics, Inc (SGI), is responsible for all commercial aspects of SGI’s synthetic DNA business and focuses on strategic business relationships with both academic and commercial researchers. Building on the scientific advancements and breakthroughs from leading scientists such as J. Craig Venter, Ham Smith, Clyde Hutchison, Dan Gibson and their teams, SGI-DNA utilizes unique and proprietary DNA technologies to produce complex synthetic genes and reagents. SGI-DNA also offers the BioXp™ 3200 System, the world’s first DNA printer, in addition to a comprehensive suite of genomic services, including whole genome sequencing, library design, bioinformatics services, and reagent kits to enable synthetic biology.

# # #

Contact

SGI Media Contact:

Ben Chiarelli

media@syntheticgenomics.com

Teams at Venter Institute and Synthetic Genomics, Inc. Successfully Engineer 16S rRNA using One Step Process Combining CRISPR/Cas9 Systems and Yeast Recombination Machinery

(LA JOLLA, CA)—August 4, 2016—Researchers from the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) and Synthetic Genomics, Inc. (SGI) have published research describing a method for engineering Mycoplasma mycoides 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) using a one-step process that combines CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system with yeast recombination machinery.

The rRNAs are some of the most conserved genes in all branches of life and thus are used to trace evolutionary history. While they are fundamental to the process of protein synthesis, to date they have been challenging to engineer since they are present as multiple copies in almost every genome.

The JCVI/SGI team, led by Krishna Kannan, Ph.D., SGI and senior author Daniel G. Gibson, Ph.D., SGI and JCVI, believe that this new combined technique has wide applications in the field of synthetic biology and can be used to both study the function of 16S rRNA specifically but also to help more broadly interrogate any genetic structure and answer basic questions of biology.

Bacteria, such as E. coli, are widely used in research as model organisms to study basic biological functions because of their often small and simple genomes and gene architectures. While the development of CRISPR/Cas9 systems have made gene editing much easier in some prokaryotic organisms, their utility has still been generally limited in many bacteria. Given the JCVI/SGI team’s expertise in development of many new tools in synthetic biology in their quest to construct the first synthetic bacterial cell, they set out to see if a combination of these tools and CRISPR/Cas9 could bring advances to the field.

The team began the process to edit the M. mycoides genome by first cloning it in a strain of yeast expressing Cas9. This genome was subsequently converted into a non-functional form through replacement of the essential “rrs” gene (that encodes for the 16S rRNA) with a ura3 yeast marker. By using in vitro transcribed guide RNAs, this ura3 gene was replaced with synthetically engineered 16S rRNA cassettes in yeast. The capacity of these16S rRNA cassettes to support life (by converting the genome to a functional state) was tested by genome transplantation from yeast into M. capricolum recipient cells.

By combining CRISPR/Cas9 editing technology with the yeast homologous recombination machinery, genome transplantation and other tools developed by the JCVI/SGI team, the group has developed an efficient, high throughput platform to test engineered essential genes like the 16S rRNA thus facilitating more experiments into biological function and helping to answer basic questions of life.

“This new genomic platform would allow us to quickly engineer any essential gene in the “simplest” M. mycoides genome and obtain a quick, binary “yes” or “no” answer as to whether the modification introduced could support cellular viability. Using this platform, we observed a surprising resilience of the 16S rRNA gene when extensive modifications were introduced,” said Dr. Kannan, Scientist, Synthetic Systems and DNA Technologies Group, SGI.

“This work highlights the power of combining advanced genome editing and synthetic DNA technologies to build novel cells with unique characteristics,” said Dr. Gibson, Vice President, DNA Technologies, SGI; Associate Professor, JCVI.

The paper describing this research is being published today in the journal Scientific Reports. Other JCVI and SGI researchers on this paper are: J. Craig Venter, Ph.D., Hamilton Smith, M.D., Clyde Hutchison, Ph.D., John Glass, Ph.D., Chuck Merryman, Ph.D., Billyana Tsvetanova, Ph.D., Ray-Yuan Chuang, Ph.D., Vladimir Noskov, Ph.D., Nacyra Assad-Garcia, and Li Ma.

This work was funded by SGI.

The JCVI/SGI team has a long and successful history in synthetic biology research. The team, who published some of their first studies as early as 1999, culminated their efforts with the first synthetic cell, Mycoplasma mycoides JCVI-syn1.0 in 2010, and in March 2016 published result of the successful construction of the first minimal synthetic cell, JCVI-syn3.0. This cell contains 531,560 base pairs and just 473 genes, making it the smallest genome of any organism that can be grown in laboratory media.

About J. Craig Venter Institute

The JCVI is a not-for-profit research institute in Rockville, MD and La Jolla, CA dedicated to the advancement of the science of genomics; the understanding of its implications for society; and communication of those results to the scientific community, the public, and policymakers. Founded by J. Craig Venter, Ph.D., the JCVI is home to approximately 200 scientists and staff with expertise in human and evolutionary biology, genetics, bioinformatics/informatics, information technology, high-throughput DNA sequencing, genomic and environmental policy research, and public education in science and science policy. The JCVI is a 501 (c)(3) organization. For additional information, please visit http://www.JCVI.org.

About Synthetic Genomics Inc.

Synthetic Genomics Inc. (SGI), located in La Jolla, CA, is a leader in the fields of synthetic biology and synthetic genomics, advancing genomics to better life. SGI applies its intellectual property in this rapidly evolving field to design and build biological systems solving global sustainability challenges. SGI serves three end markets: research, bioproduction, and applied products. The company’s research offerings, commercialized through its subsidiary SGI-DNA, are revolutionizing science and medicine with next-generation genomic solutions, including the world’s first DNA printer. SGI applies its integrated synthetic biology capabilities to reinvent bio-based production by improving existing production systems and developing novel, optimized production hosts. SGI develops its applied products, typically in partnership with leading global organizations, across a variety of industries including sustainable bio-fuels, sustainable crops, nutritional supplements, vaccines, and transplantable organs.

Contacts

JCVI Media Contact: Heather Kowalski, hkowalski@jcvi.org or 858-361-0466
SGI Media Contact: Ben Chiarelli, media@syntheticgenomics.com

Synthetic Genomics, Inc. to Present at the Jefferies 2016 Healthcare Conference

LA JOLLA, CA – June 6, 2016 – Synthetic Genomics, Inc. (SGI) announced today that Oliver Fetzer, Ph.D., MBA, Chief Executive Officer of Synthetic Genomics, Inc., will provide a corporate overview and presentation at the Jefferies 2016 Healthcare Conference on Friday, June 10, 2016 at 8:30am ET (5:30am PT) in New York, NY.

About Synthetic Genomics

Synthetic Genomics Inc. (SGI), located in La Jolla, CA, is a leader in the fields of synthetic biology and synthetic genomics, advancing genomics to better life. SGI applies its intellectual property in this rapidly evolving field to design and build biological systems solving global sustainability challenges. SGI serves three end markets: research, bioproduction, and applied products. The company’s research offerings, commercialized through its subsidiary SGI-DNA, are revolutionizing science and medicine with next-generation genomic solutions, including the world’s first DNA printer. SGI applies its integrated synthetic biology capabilities to reinvent bio-based production by improving existing production systems and developing novel, optimized production hosts. SGI develops its applied products, typically in partnership with leading global organizations, across a variety of industries including sustainable bio-fuels, sustainable crops, nutritional supplements, vaccines, and transplantable organs.

Media Contact

Ben Chiarelli, VP of Corporate Development and Strategy
media@syntheticgenomics.com

Synthetic Genomics, Inc. Hires Anthony Artuso as Chief Business Officer

La Jolla, CA, May 3, 2016—Synthetic Genomics, Inc. (SGI), a leader in the field of synthetic biology, announced today that Anthony Artuso has joined its executive team as Chief Business Officer. Anthony is an accomplished executive and entrepreneur with over 20 years of broad domestic and international experience in biotech, clean energy, finance, public policy, and sustainable development.

Oliver Fetzer, SGI CEO, said “We are pleased to add Anthony to our executive team and under his leadership we will further expand SGI’s industry leading synthetic biology partnerships.  Anthony’s extensive experience in strategy and corporate development will accelerate our commercialization momentum while his breadth and depth of experience make him well suited to play an integral part in SGI’s evolution.”

Before joining SGI, Anthony spent six years with Merck Millipore where he headed the company’s protein and cellular analysis business, and previous to that was in charge of strategic planning and business development for Merck Millipore Bioscience. Anthony’s pharmaceutical industry experience includes building and leading the strategic planning, portfolio management, and competitive intelligence functions at Vertex Pharmaceuticals. Prior to that he spent seven years at Bristol-Myers Squibb, where he was in charge of strategic planning and portfolio management, as well as strategy and decision analysis for new product development, licensing and M&A.

Anthony has also served as a faculty member at the University of Charleston and Rutgers University where he became recognized internationally for his work on the chemical and genetic value of biodiversity. He also advised the World Bank, United Nations, and various U.S. government and multi-national agencies. Earlier in his career, Anthony worked in the public sector where he constructed a blueprint for the deregulation of US electricity generation, directed a billion-dollar capital improvement program and implemented regional water pollution control programs, and served as Chief Financial Officer of a major public sector utility.

About Synthetic Genomics

Synthetic Genomics Inc. (SGI), located in La Jolla, CA, is a leader in the fields of synthetic biology and synthetic genomics, advancing genomics to better life.  SGI applies its intellectual property in this rapidly evolving field to design and build biological systems solving global sustainability challenges.  SGI serves three end markets: research, bioproduction, and applied products.  The company’s research offerings, commercialized through its subsidiary SGI-DNA, are revolutionizing science and medicine with next-generation genomic solutions, including the world’s first DNA printer.  SGI applies its integrated synthetic biology capabilities to reinvent bio-based production by improving existing production systems and developing novel, optimized production hosts. SGI develops its applied products, typically in partnership with leading global organizations, across a variety of industries including sustainable bio-fuels, sustainable crops, nutritional supplements, vaccines, and transplantable organs.

Media Contact

Ben Chiarelli, VP of Corporate Development and Strategy
media@syntheticgenomics.com

First Minimal Synthetic Bacterial Cell Designed and Constructed by Scientists at Venter Institute and Synthetic Genomics, Inc.

(LA JOLLA, CA)—March 24, 2016—Researchers from Synthetic Genomics Inc. (SGI) and the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) announced today the design and construction of the first minimal synthetic bacterial cell, JCVI-syn3.0. Using the first synthetic cell, Mycoplasma mycoides JCVI-syn1.0 (created by this same team in 2010), JCVI-syn3.0 was developed through a design, build, and test process using genes from JCVI-syn1.0. The new minimal synthetic cell contains 531,560 base pairs and just 473 genes, making it the smallest genome of any organism that can be grown in laboratory media. By comparison the first synthetic cell, M. mycoides JCVI-syn1.0 has 1.08 million base pairs and 901 genes.

A paper describing this research is being published in the March 25 print version of the journal Science by lead author Clyde A. Hutchison, III, Ph.D., senior author J. Craig Venter, Ph.D., and senior team of Hamilton O. Smith, MD, Daniel G. Gibson, Ph.D., and John I. Glass, Ph.D.

The team concludes that a major outcome of this minimal cell program are new tools and semi-automated processes for whole genome synthesis. Many of these synthetic biology tools are commercially accessible through kits, instruments and services provided by SGI and SGI-DNA including a synthetic DNA construction service specializing in building large and complex DNA fragments including combinatorial gene libraries, Archetype® genomics software, Gibson Assembly® kits, and the BioXp™ 3200 System, which is a benchtop instrument for producing accurate synthetic DNA fragments.

“This paper signifies a major step toward our ability to design and build synthetic organisms from the bottom up with predictable outcomes. The tools and knowledge gained from this work will be essential to producing next generation production platforms for a wide range of disciplines,” said Dr. Gibson, Vice President, DNA Technologies, SGI; Associate Professor, JCVI.

This work, in combination with the long legacy of “world’s first” innovations from SGI and JCVI, positions Synthetic Genomics to revolutionize genomic research and reinvent cell-based production processes. For decades, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, alternative energy, nutritional and bio-chemical companies have relied on legacy host systems to produce bio-based products and therapies. The design and construction of the first minimal cell lays the foundation for SGI and our partners to design and build biological systems for purpose, thus enabling improvements to existing products as well as the creation of novel solutions to solve global sustainability challenges.

”This important milestone lays the foundation to rationally design and engineer bio-based production systems. For example, we see a very large opportunity to revolutionize the discovery and manufacture of life-saving medicines produced biologically, an ever increasing portion of today’s most innovative medicines” said Oliver Fetzer, SGI CEO.

The press release from our collaboration partner, JCVI, can be found at: http://www.jcvi.org/research/projects/minimal-cell/

Video of JCVI-syn3.0 can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=giEJK5zHJmw

About Synthetic Genomics
Synthetic Genomics Inc. (SGI), located in La Jolla, CA, is a leader in the fields of synthetic biology and synthetic genomics, advancing genomics to better life. SGI applies its intellectual property in this rapidly evolving field to design and build biological systems solving global sustainability challenges. SGI serves three end markets: research, bioproduction, and applied products. The company’s research offerings, commercialized through its subsidiary SGI-DNA, are revolutionizing science and medicine with next-generation genomic solutions, including the world’s first DNA printer. SGI applies its integrated synthetic biology capabilities to reinvent bio-based production by improving existing production systems and developing novel, optimized production hosts. SGI develops its applied products, typically in partnership with leading global organizations, across a variety of industries including sustainable bio-fuels, sustainable crops, nutritional supplements, vaccines, and transplantable organs.

About J. Craig Venter Institute
The JCVI is a not-for-profit research institute in Rockville, MD and La Jolla, CA dedicated to the advancement of the science of genomics; the understanding of its implications for society; and communication of those results to the scientific community, the public, and policymakers. Founded by J. Craig Venter, Ph.D., the JCVI is home to approximately 200 scientists and staff with expertise in human and evolutionary biology, genetics, bioinformatics/informatics, information technology, high-throughput DNA sequencing, genomic and environmental policy research, and public education in science and science policy. The JCVI is a 501 (c)(3) organization. For additional information, please visit http://www.JCVI.org.

Media Contacts

Heather Kowalski
hkowalski@jcvi.org
858-361-0466

Ben Chiarelli, VP of Corporate Development and Strategy
media@syntheticgenomics.com

Synthetic Genomics, Inc. Hires Robert H. Cutler as General Counsel

La Jolla, CA, March 3, 2016 – Synthetic Genomics, Inc. (SGI), a leader in the field of synthetic biology, announced today that Robert H. (Rob) Cutler is joining its executive team as General Counsel and Corporate Secretary. Rob has 20 years of corporate legal, intellectual property licensing, regulatory compliance, business development and mergers and acquisitions experience, most of which has been spent in the biotech industry in private and public companies and earlier in his career at leading law firms.

Oliver Fetzer, SGI CEO, said “We are pleased to add Rob to our executive team and look forward to advancing SGI’s industry leading synthetic biology platform under his counsel. Rob’s extensive experience in corporate transactions and corporate governance is an ideal fit as SGI accelerates its growth.  Rob’s life science expertise makes him well suited to play an integral part in SGI’s evolution.”

Rob received his Juris Doctor (JD) degree, graduating cum laude from the Brigham Young University J. Reuben Clark Law School. Rob was most recently General Counsel and Corporate Secretary at LifeVantage Corporation from 2011-2015 where he was responsible for all legal, regulatory, and compliance activities, managed all securities filings, and led expansion into multiple foreign jurisdictions. Prior to LifeVantage, Rob was Vice President, Business Development for Somaxon Pharmaceuticals. Rob also served as Associate General Counsel and Senior Director, Business Development at Biogen Idec Inc. from 2001-2010 where he managed business development efforts for the oncology business unit and closed over $1.5 billion in transactions including acquisitions, multi-product collaborations, strategic alliances, product divestitures and research and academic collaborations.  Prior to joining Biogen Idec, Rob spent several years in private law practice with two large full service law firms where he counseled both private and public companies in securities matters, general corporate transactions and mergers and acquisitions.

About Synthetic Genomics

Synthetic Genomics Inc. (SGI), located in La Jolla, CA, is a leader in the fields of synthetic biology and synthetic genomics, advancing genomics to better life. SGI applies its intellectual property in this rapidly evolving field to design and build biological systems solving global sustainability challenges. SGI serves three end markets: research, bioproduction, and applied products. The company’s research offerings, commercialized through its subsidiary SGI-DNA, are revolutionizing science and medicine with next-generation genomic solutions, including the world’s first DNA printer. SGI applies its integrated synthetic biology capabilities to reinvent bio-based production by improving existing production systems and developing novel, optimized production hosts. SGI develops its applied products, typically in partnership with leading global organizations, across a variety of industries including sustainable bio-fuels, sustainable crops, nutritional supplements, vaccines, and transplantable organs.

Media Contact

Ben Chiarelli, VP of Corporate Development and Strategy
media@syntheticgenomics.com

SGI-DNA Launches Automated Cloning Module for the BioXp™ 3200 System and Reaches another Instrument Milestone

LA JOLLA, CA – January 13, 2016 – SGI-DNA, a Synthetic Genomics, Inc. (SGI) company, announced today that the world’s first DNA printer, the BioXp™ 3200 System, has reached another milestone with the release of the BioXp™ cloning module. The addition of the cloning module to the instrument repertoire further solidifies SGI-DNA as an industry leader at the forefront of synthetic biology innovations and solutions. Users of the BioXp™ System cloning module may focus on DNA analytics and discovery, instead of the traditional time- and labor-intensive steps involved in DNA cloning. Simply stated, the BioXp™ System automates and expedites DNA cloning, a procedure used in nearly every academic and commercial molecular biology laboratory worldwide.

BioXp™ 3200 System Capabilities

The BioXp™ genomic workstation generates high-quality, linear DNA fragments from custom designed oligonucleotide pools and reagents. Now, with the introduction of the cloning module, the BioXp™ System has the additional capability to simultaneously deliver up to 24 circular DNA clones from custom DNA sequences. The launch of this first-of-its-kind module allows researchers to obtain cloned de novo DNA fragments in the laboratory virtually hands-free, further automating and shortening molecular biology work flows.

Julie Robinson, SGI Senior Product Manager comments, “In just 9 months, since the BioXp™ System was first launched, SGI-DNA is delivering on its stated plan to expand instrument capabilities. Our more than 25 life science research laboratory customers throughout the United States can upgrade their systems seamlessly over the internet without any hardware changes.  This scalable design is at the heart for the BioXp™ system.  By launching the cloning module SGI-DNA is moving from early access to full launch of the BioXp™ 3200 System.”

BioXp™ 3200 System Future Plans

The instrument’s multifunctional deck enables the machine to be upgraded to automate molecular biology workflows even more fully over time. Currently customers can order the machine, have it installed, and begin making DNA clones in a matter of weeks. SGI-DNA works closely with customers to optimize their use of the machine and has a complete line of DNA synthesis products and services which complement the BioXp™ 3200 System.

Due to its novelty and flexibility of use, the BioXp™ System was awarded Frost & Sullivan’s 2015 New Product Innovation Award for Synthetic Biology. The instrument also received CE Mark certification in 2015, allowing it to be sold in Europe, with plans to launch the product overseas in 2016. The adoption of the instrument at several leading biotechnology companies, government laboratories, and research institutions portends that global demand for the BioXp™3200 System will be strong.

About Synthetic Genomics

Synthetic Genomics Inc. (SGI) is a privately-held company dedicated to developing and commercializing genomic-driven solutions to address a wide range of global challenges. The company is focused on several key commercialization programs including developing new synthetic DNA products, tools and instruments through SGI-DNA, a wholly owned subsidiary of SGI. Building on the scientific advancements and breakthroughs from leading scientists such as J. Craig Venter, Hamilton Smith, Clyde Hutchison, Dan Gibson and their teams, SGI-DNA utilizes unique and proprietary DNA technologies to accelerate the pace of synthetic biology discovery and innovation.

Oliver Fetzer, Ph.D., MBA, chief executive officer of Synthetic Genomics, Inc., will provide a corporate overview and presentation at the J.P. Morgan 34th Annual Healthcare Conference on Wednesday, January 13, 2016 at 1:00 p.m. ET (10:00 a.m. PT) in San Francisco, California.

For more information about our latest advances and the award-winning BioXp™ 3200 Instrument, please visit www.sgidna.com.

Media Contact

Mary Canady, Senior Marketing Manager
mcanady@syntheticgenomics.com
858.260.1413

Synthetic Genomics, Inc. to Present at the J.P. Morgan 34th Annual Healthcare Conference

LA JOLLA, CA – January 6, 2016 – Synthetic Genomics, Inc. (SGI) announced today that Oliver Fetzer, Ph.D., MBA, chief executive officer of Synthetic Genomics, Inc., will provide a corporate overview and presentation at the J.P. Morgan 34th Annual Healthcare Conference on Wednesday, January 13, 2016 at 1:00 p.m. ET (10:00 a.m. PT) in San Francisco, California.

About Synthetic Genomics

SGI is a privately-held company dedicated to developing and commercializing genomic-driven solutions to address a wide range of global challenges. We are using this technology, and developing new and more advanced methods, to create the next generation of renewable and sustainably-produced biology-based products.The company is focused on several key commercialization programs including developing new synthetic DNA products, tools and instruments; improving existing production hosts and developing new synthetic hosts; developing new and improved algae-based biofuels, food and nutritional products; and developing synthetically-derived vaccines and anti-microbials. The company is also developing sustainable agricultural products through AgraCast, a company co-founded with Plenus S.A. de C.V. For more information go to: www.syntheticgenomics.com

Contacts

Company Contact:
Ben Chiarelli, VP of Corporate Development and Strategy
media@syntheticgenomics.com

Media Contact
Jason I. Spark, Senior Vice President Canale Communications
jason@canalecomm.com
619.849.6005